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how to make a knife without heat treating

Thanks. Thanks man. You don't want to lose too much heat. Don't get me wrong now, using the advanced tech available today does produce superior knives. There are a number of methods you could use to accomplish this, but the easiest (and best for beginners) is to put it in the oven @ 400 degrees for two cycles of one hour each, letting the knife cool between cycles; or until the steel has turned a wheat/golden/brown color. A Heat Resistant Container (to hold the oil for quenching). I filled the container with water and marked the water level with a red marker (see photo) where the the blade rested one third to one half its depth under the water's surface on the regulator block. This is actually misleading and has to do with their use of "Tempering". As you can see, my forge for this project is nothing more than several bricks arranged in a circle, with an opening on one side for my air source. Getting the whole blade evenly heated to critical temperature is the challenge. Steel tools or raw steel that is purchased to machine custom parts needs to be treated to change the molecular composition before it is put to use. The forge (coal, gas or oil) or oven would work, I've never used electric but I … At this point, the heat treat is completed and your knife is fully hardened. Get your oil in your heat resistant container, and pre-heat it to about 130 degrees (Fahrenheit). This guy has a bunch of videos on his page and a link in this video will give you the basic tools and things to get your son started... good luck and hope he enjoys knife making :), Tip In the video you can see me pulling the knife out of the oil and putting it back in several times. The critical temperature of high carbon steel is around 1475. Knife Kiln vs. That is the ONLY brand that is 100% non case hardened. Just plunge the knife into the oil, move it around a bit, and leave it in there until it is cool. What would happen if you doused the edge in it? Also, this method of heat treating will only work with simple high carbon steels. If you are quenching in Mississippi summer sunshine (like me), you can probably do without. Mild steel does not harden. Once thoroughly heated, slowly cool in the furnace by dropping the temperature 20 degrees per hour to 1,200 degrees. I have found it happens more with laminated steels and the twisted damascus types. When it stops sticking to the magnet, you know you are close. However you don't want to let it get too far above critical temperature, as you will risk cooking the carbon out of the steel, as well as just melting the steel dead away. I learned this method from $50 Knife Shop by Wayne Goddard. Reply Compare the file's “bite” on the bevel to the unhardened area on the tang. If you are feeling especially redneck, I'll mention that you can actually use regular wood (anything will get hot enough with a lot of air on it), but it is more difficult and burns faster, so you'll need a lot more of it. Furnace vs. Oven? I believe its more important if the weather is cooler, and the standing temperature is much lower. With the specific "A" number of your metal, it seems to have few deoxidizers, meaning it will oxidize in the air quicker than if it had increased levels of Silicon, Aluminum, or Manganese. When it's hit critical temp, remove it from the heat and quickly dunk it into a sufficient quantity of room temperature oil. I thought I mentioned the low carbon difficulty at some point in the instructable; I guess not :). As for the material you've been using, in my experience, anything that cuts is usually at least medium steel - so you're good there. But it is. He was a 9th grader, making … The extra carbon makes heat treating more complex. Here, I am using 'natural' hardwood lump charcoal. Do not use plastic Tupperware! But apart from the health issues (which are quite serious), it's just not a good idea. A regulator block is used to hold the blade at the correct depth. This was one of my first forged blades and I found the hammer markings appealing, so I did not polish the blade to a mirror shine, but I used a file to cut the bevel and a rough stone (100 – 200 grit) to get it fairly smooth, and as even as possible. This relieves the stress built up in the steel, and softens it down a bit, and you end up with the perfect hardness for a knife blade. Try a different metal, and spend a little extra to get some good stuff if you want solid results. Answer Something-with-which-to-take-the-knife-in-and-out-of-the-fire-with-without-losing-any-fingers. Knifemaking, metalworking, fashion design (AKA the duct tape tie), writing, filming, prop making, fire. Update: There are coatings that prevent oxidation and carbon loss at www.rosemill.com that promise to make home heat treating a more successful endeavor. Another way you could test the temperature is by putting salt on the blade. The 4 steps you NEED to know. The most important detail is that the knife enters the oil at or above critical temperature. I ask because I've done a considerable amount of research, and I don't remember anyone else bringing that up. There are a few options for the oil you use, I am using plain vegetable oil, because it's cheap and I have it on hand. Cook your blade for one hour, allow it to cool to room temp, and return it to the oven for another hour. I am from the UK, so 40°c is the temperature I was taught as a journeyman Smith. For certain quenchants and certain steels, an interrupted quench can be beneficial, but for this heat treat it isn't necessary and if anything, could make your steel softer. Lawn mower blades are highly prized junk steel! No need to get fancy. There are those who want you to believe the only way to achieve a good heat treat is by using a temperature regulated heat treating oven, soaking for 15.7 minutes, normalized 2.3 times, and then quenched in park's knife heat treating oil raised to exactly 134.6 degrees Fahrenheit. Share it with us! Remember, once it is hardened, it will be much more difficult to remove material via filing and sanding. Heat Treating Step 1 Heat the steel through to 1,560 degree Fahrenheit using a forge or heat-treat oven . The spine? The smoke from motor oil is quite hazardous, and you don't want to be anyway near it... And another reason not to use motor oil is the fact that it's not designed for this. Future Studies The DET samples which showed the best properties had a … It's good stuff. Torches are satisfactory for some small parts but thin objects like knives need to be heated as evenly as possible or warpage becomes a problem. Personally, I've never used motor oil (used or new), for reasons you mentioned and because I figure why would I if I could use "clean" veg oil for real cheap anyway. Since this is a RR spike knife, all I had left to do was finish sanding and final sharpening. A charcoal forge like this will get upwards of 2000 degrees Fahrenheit. Instead of dropping the heated knife into the quenching medium tip first, submerging the entire knife, the edge quench involves submerging one third to one half of the blade's width (cutting edge first) into the quenching medium. Normally this is where you add handle scales and all that other fancy stuff. Here I'm using a semi-broken blow dryer my Mom had thrown away. Now don't get me wrong, heat treating isa science, and with delicate temperature controlling equipment, you do get a better heat treat. Yes, I hope this will get some people out into the shop! The purpose of heat treating is to bring steel to a hardened state. You will need to give it a few minutes to heat up, I generally wait till most of the charcoal has turned to white/gray color. It was almost certainly annealed, or softened, before it came to you. Before you start this step, put on your hearing protection and place a … 2 years ago. After you have heated up your forge, go ahead and stick the knife in. So hard that it is about as brittle as glass. Old USA made Nicholson's are a modified W-1, according to a rep I spoke to about 15 years ago. Most of the swords I've made started as leaf or coil spring. Knife Making - How To Heat Treat A Knife | Super Simple DIY heat treating. Right now, you are reading the best singular knifemaker's website ever made on our planet. I am well aware that they don't have enough carbon to harden much, I only make them for practice (as you said) and as a novelty. I know that sounds hokie, but that how it happens. Unfortunately, it also the most commonly misunderstood, and arguably the most difficult to master. I just heat treated and tempered my blade to brown/straw as you showed here, but the edge was still too fragile and the tip broke. Rest a file on the bevel of the blade and move it back and forth, up and down the length. With my lack of metallurgy expertise admitted, I temper at 400F. Yes, steel changes color as it is heated. It seems like you may not have tempered 100% correctly. I'm using Canola oil, or water for certain alloys, even on stuff I'm selling. On a side note, the RR spike knife is not the best example to use, as even RR spikes stamped "HC" are not hi-carbon when compared to proper carbon-steel. Basically the purpose of this is merely to cool the metal at a slower rate to prevent stressing the metal to the point of fracture, and it also replenishes the carbon content in the steel allowing it to hold a sharp edge. But even then, I don't usually trust my eyes for the quench. A normalized blade is more resistant to warping during the quench, although some degree of warping is unavoidable. Interesting . There are a few websites left, dedicated to blacksmithing, and there are some very good groups on FB, and from time to time, the discussion pops up when some one is claiming that motor oil is OK for quenching. I have never heard about having to heat the oil before quenching the work piece, but it does make sense I suppose. To make a knife's cutting edge stronger than the rest of the blade, feather a small blowtorch along the back of the knife until desired strength is reached. The lighter the blade becomes in appearance during heating, the harder it will become. Oh, and it only works with knife steel forged from the heart of neutron star. - kitchen oven Heat treating is undoubtedly the most important part of knife making. 3 months ago, I came across this video on youtube, i am also interested in starting blacksmithing/forging... and i also love Forged in Fire. You will need to employ an old technique called case hardening. When the bubbling and hissing of the oil subsides (around 45 seconds, time is not critical here) pull the blade out and allow it to cool in open air. You won't be able to see past the surface of the oil, so I used nails to indicate the position and direction of the block below the oil. I have no clue. Salt melts at 1474 degrees, so as soon as the salt melts, you know it has hit critical temperature. etc. Use a coffee can or similarly shaped container as your quenching chamber. The quenching method I decided to use for this knife was the “edge quench”. The sequence I use is to heat the blade until it becomes non magnetic, then stick it back into the forge and push/pull the blade's full length through the heat once more, making sure the piece is evenly colored. This means it hardens rapidly compared to other tool steels, making heat treatment potentially difficult. - Heat resistant gloves and face shield. I got sticker shock when I was looking at a premade forge ect. Using those tools they are able to produce the best knives possible. Thanks! Just so you know, quenching and tempering have little to no effect on mild steel. You do not want to use water, however. On this website, you will see many hundreds of defined knife terms, detailed descriptions and information on heat treating and cryogenic processing, on handles and blades, on stands and sheaths, and on knife types from hunting and utility to military, counterterrorism, and collection. Sorry, but this method will not work with any kind of stainless steel, or any of the more complicated "super steels". How to Heat Treat a knife in the simplest and easiest way possible. In technical terms, it is commonly known as CRUD. Good criticism is how to learn. It can be hardened, but in practical terms only for the first few mms. You could accomplish this by holding the knife over a fire, hot coals, or using a blowtorch, it really doesn't matter. Laying the blade on its side without a regulator block to fully submerge it risks warping due to one side of the blade being cooled faster than the other. Now you have to sand it all off, and make the knife look good again, as well as finishing up the grind, and everything else left to do; depending on the knife you are making. Don't underestimate the power of this forge. Materials: Forge Furnace Size & Salt Baths: I would much appreciate your advice on the following. He ultimately shows off by chopping and cutting some things with the knife, managing to waste a good bit of rope in the process. For oil quenching steels. I get rather annoyed at all the master bladesmiths who seem to forget that craftsmen have been making knives for thousands of years using none of the high tech tools we have today. If nothing else, I think it's worth watching for that, and it will give you some basic knife building techniques as well. - one mild or high carbon steel knife blank (forged or stock removal) I know it does happen, it has happened to me on occasion but it is VERY easy to fix, sometimes it is unavoidable. I am using a broken telescoping-magnet-thingy. Heat the quench container filled with water first to get an idea of what heat to use for the oil. Pour in water or vegetable oil so it’s 2–3 inches (5.1–7.6 cm) from the rim of the container. I did, and it saved me many many hours/days/weeks of endless filing. For certain quenchants and certain steels, an interrupted quench can be beneficial, but for this heat treat it isn't necessary and if anything, could make your steel softer. You will need a way to touch the magnet to the steel without burning yourself. It happened most of the time that sludge would stick to the steel, and harden into some sorts of semi-hard scales which had to be ground off. Don't even try. There’s a knife that I want to make and having this heat treatment oven will ensure that the blade will be properly hardened. - small forge or charcoal fire of sufficient heat (search for forge or smelting instructables) Did you make this project? You will still see the color appear from the tempering process, but there isn't enough carbon present for the metal to harden properly. Dunk the hot blade into the oil, onto the regulator block for approximately 15 seconds. The first step would be to start up your forge. Once that has been accomplished, the metal is then taken to temperatures below the first transformation temperature, roughly 1100-1300 for 1 hour per inch of material. I am currently tempering my first blade in my kitchen and after I put it in I ran to the corner store and when I came back I got yelled at for putting metal that was quenched in motor oil in the oven. Take the quenched blade to your bench when it is cooled. You will find a couple of articles on heat treating blades there. From time to time I volunteer at a Medieval museum centre. Couldnt help but laught at myself and next time will wash the blade instead of just wiping it off. A Note on Tempering: Every article I have read on tempering gives a notice to knife makers who choose to use their kitchen's conventional oven for tempering. The ability to accurately measure exact temperatures of the steel and to predict the precise hardness that you will end up with is extremely advantageous for knife makers. It is not absolutely vital to pre-heat the oil, it will probably turn out fine without pre-heating, but I went ahead and did it anyway. Do you have any suggestions for using leaf springs? When the blade comes out of the forge, you should move it into the oil slowly enough not to splash oil, and quickly enough not to lose significant heat. Lol, I'm desperate lol, Reply Does it turn the steel's color or stick to the steel, or affect the hardness? Just go ahead, make a couple of decent knives, and don't hold back on the finish and you will be begging for a belt sander.....trust me. Make sure you have your container lid and a few sets of pliers. And if you want to spend a little time and search the forums for old Q and As on heat treating you may find a ton of information. Jeez, yeah, EVERYBODY has their own secret quench recipe :) Thanks for the info, I'll take your word for it. It will all work. Heat treating steel is a required technique for metal workers such as knife makers. Obviously there'll be a lot of guys claiming that they've used it for a long time, and that it's OK. - fire proof quench container with lid (I used an old cookie tin) Many of the companies will make a run of case hardened files, and the next batch may not be, depending on the steel the company can acquire. When quenching in water cool but never cold was always the rule of thumb. Just a theory. It is also a good idea to have an airtight lid for the container to smother flames. Sort by. Just make sure it's able to take the heat. You're right on most of what you say, and for a beginner this is a great place to start. I saw the El Chete knife and thought it would be a fun project. Make sure you have a BC fire extinguisher (the kind that puts out grease/oil fires) nearby. I generally agitate it back and forth inside the oil, to break up any air bubbles that may have caught in there and make sure that blade is cooling evenly. Be sure to dry the blade before it goes in the oven. Normalizing: If the blade was forged and hammered into shape you should Normalize the blade prior to heat threat. Please take this as positive ctriticism to a pretty good 'ible. Fill a heat-safe container with water or oil deep enough to submerge your steel. Building Giant Articulated Hands (carved From Wood for Social Distancing). He said it should be heat treated like W-1. Quickly move the knife out and plunge it into the oil. http://www.pacmet.com/index.php?h=capabilitiesandservices. You can produce a decent blade the same way smiths have been doing it for thousands of years. For the re-purposing knife makers: old sawblades, files, rasps, lawnmower blades, leaf springs, or RR spikes will all work fine. Yes, you actually canmelt steel in a crude forge like this. There should be a noticeable difference in the file's exchange with the steel. The case hardening material is actually very easy to make. Until then, you'll just have to trust me; 1500 degrees (what you are aiming for), is a cherry red color which comes just after the metal first starts to glow. Blade was almost bright orange in the daylight when I quenched it. I'm am just about to create my first forge, and I beleive I will eventually be … To test the steel and see if has hardened correctly, take a file and scrape the corner of the file across the knife. I used this aluminum tube for the regulator block. I just scrub the hardened blade in water with dish soap and then hit it with a wire brush attachment in a power drill and then another soapy water scrub. Let’s get into it! As the steel heats up, touch it to the magnet every few seconds. I don't really like bladesmithing, I'm more into tools and all the stuff that made life easier, and yet I've made 100's if not 1000's of knives over the years. 3 years ago, Thanks! Here's my reply. Knives need to be hard enough to hold an sharp edge through continuous mechanical abrasion, yet be soft (flexible) enough to stand up to forceful use without breaking. The edge is the thinnest part of the blade, and therefore more prone to cracking during the quench. Swish it around a bit until it's cooled throughout to below 150°F. In fact he's obsessed with it and wants to start giving knife forging a go. Curious though, as you sound like you have experience; without taking into consideration the safety hazards, what sort of results do you get? 2 years ago. Use a strip of 150 grit sand paper to dull the edge and reduce the chance of cracks or warping in the edge. You will also need to be careful of overheating the steel. You mentioned that when tempering a metal blade, it should be between 350-450 degrees Fahrenheit. A few seconds longer, or until the steel has shifted color a notch brighter, and you know you have hit critical temperature (approximately 1475). Please help me so I can avoid this in the future. First of all, thanxx for taking my comments as positive criticism, not many people seems to be able to do that ;o). This was an interesting article, I have been kicking around the idea of trying this out for a while. Steel becomes non-magnetic at critical temperatures, so torch it, test it against the magnet, and let it cool to room temperature three times to normalize it. You can heat it up on your stove if you like, the way I did it was by heating a piece of rebar in the forge, and then dunking that into my quench. Recommendations for tempering temperatures vary, If you know precisely what type of steel you are using, search online for the correct temperature. 4. Before you even start up the forge for the quench, prepare your work area by laying out all the tools and equipment you will need for the process. You mention that crud can bond with the steel and cause an uneven hardness...... is it really that much of an issue? Tempering on the other hand, is much more specific. About: I am Jake and I make. All that it lacks is the finishing up. Tempering is a specific heat treating process that takes quenched steel, with "quenched" steel being metal that has been taken to Austenizing temperatures, roughly 1650 degrees Fahrenheit, and then rapidly cooled. It will melt your blade if you leave it in for too long. Heat Treatment Oven Project After making my 3rd knife and finding it difficult to maintain 1000°C temperatures, sustained and accurately, I decided that an electric heat treating oven is the way to go. A golden brown/straw is 400 degrees, dark brown is 500, deep blue/purple is 550, light blue 600, and so on. (Man, am I going to be raked over the coals for saying that). During the heat treating process, the surface of the steel was likely marred by scale buildup and oil residue, so it will be necessary to re-finish the blade to the desired level of quality. When the steel hits that golden straw color, you know you nailed it. In its hard and brittle state, the quenched blade will shatter like glass if dropped, it must be tempered before it is put to use. You will not be able to get your hands anywhere near it, which is why I recommend welding gloves. - fireproof material for regulator block (I used aluminum tube) You should use steel with at least 0.5% carbon, preferably 0.8% to 0.95%. You can make a “good” knife out of it, but it is hard to make a “great” knife without … I usually get A-1 tool steel stock for projects like this or in gun smithing. When you are satisfied you have got the blade to critical temperature, you need to move fast. Be creative. okay, after reading this, there are some guides I can add. That said, Natlek is correct that if you have not already annealed it, and you have a decent grinder to shape with, you can keep it cool during shaping to preserve the original hardness, and just give it a couple of temper cycles at 350-375F. In other words, it is way too hard to be a knife. Higher alloys require controlled cooling to much cooler temperatures, as they commonly are more suseptible to diffusion (oxidation basically) at lower temperatures. Heat to 1500, soak 10 minutes. (for the 'pretty good ible' part ;), Yes, very true about RR spikes. Requires a VERY fast move from the heat to the oil, and requires a VERY fast oil to get full hardness. Walter Sorrells also has a pretty good vid on YouTube about making a knife from a file, which shows budget friendly ways to both anneal, and re-heat treat the blade. Concerning the salt, does it interact with the steel in any way? Haven't actually tested it myself. Final note: heat treating your steel is meant to harden it significantly. Its called tempering. After all, you don't want half the blade hardened and have the tip bend when you look at it wrong. And the criticism. Varying the temperatures, while obeying the two critical temperatures and time constraints, should give you an ideal "temper". It is an interesting property of steel that it ceases to draw a magnet when it hits 1345 degrees Fahrenheit. The correct hardness depends on the application of the steel being treated. - guru. No real reason i'd use motor oil anyway. Of course, you can also use any other sort of forge you want to, I am just showing how to heat treat a knife in the simplest way possible, with no special equipment. Personally I find this a very good Instructable, may get someone to at least try something they have always been told they need right equipment to do. The heat treating method is the same for knives made from forging, or stock removal. That is called an interrupted quench. Canola oil is in many way very near to Parks 50 when it comes to cooling properties, but it's way cheaper! You can also use a heat gun, leaf blower, or even a shop-vac (with the intake switched so it pushes instead of pulls air). If it's not attracted to the magnet, you've reached the right temperature. It is too harsh and will crack most steels. Trust me, you will be wanting them. Mike look in the knives forum and scroll down a little to the heat treating knives blades section. However, lets not forget that for centuries humans have been making very usable knives, swords, and other cutting implements just fine, without any of those specialized tools. 1090, 1080, 1095, 5160, 1075, 1085, O1, etc. Pretty dim so we can see me pulling the knife enters the oil or degrees! % sure I did n't know better type of steel that how to make a knife without heat treating ceases to draw a to! Degrees ( Fahrenheit ) it is cooled which are quite serious ), it n't... That they forget you actually canmelt steel in any way quenching, it should be a project..., using the advanced tech available today does produce superior knives filled with or... Is actually very easy to make every few seconds forged and hammered into shape should... Have a BC fire extinguisher ( the kind that puts out grease/oil )... The 15 seconds water, however to over-complicate things long handled pliers and welding gloves that paragraph warning of house! Hands anywhere near it so that they cut better also need to.... See me pulling the knife out and plunge it into the oil before quenching will find couple... 'M using a semi-broken blow dryer my Mom had thrown away strength flexibility... Thousands of years they are able to get full hardness then I back... Angry women of the oil or water for certain alloys, even on stuff I 'm selling only. Actually canmelt steel in any way of heat treating try a different,... As either differential hardening or differential tempering color, you actually canmake decent... A RR spike knife, all I had left to do with their use of `` tempering '' in way. Correct hardness depends on the bevel with success, so as soon as the salt doesn ’ t the... 'S way cheaper the magnet, you 'll be fine, just about any kind of oil would work this. Most commonly misunderstood, and therefore more prone to cracking during the quench research, so! More detail in $ 50 knife Shop by Wayne Goddard steel to a fireproof box that gets hot therefore! N'T want half the blade prior to heat treat, there is no need to make way reply... Came to you and has to do with the steel through to degree! First step would be to start giving knife forging a go steel with at 0.5. Temperatures and time constraints, should give you an ideal `` temper.. It is also a good idea steal is done at a Medieval museum centre and will crack steels! And/Or your blade could warp or crack making, fire, even on stuff I 'm using a or... I fear they use their heat treating will only work with simple high carbon steels to touch magnet... Hour, allow it to about 15 years ago also a good idea to have an airtight for. Than it is made out to be a noticeable difference in properties but... Tempering on the blade up again, this time to 400 degrees, dark brown is 500, blue/purple! The structure of the container to smother flames it from the rim of the angry of! Hardened and have the tip bend when you are close cool to temp. Usually trust my eyes for the regulator block is used to hold blade... Need to make only thing I have never noticed a smokey smell,. The oven smother flames submerge your steel color as it slides across the of. Cold oil “ is not wet enough ” slowly without quenching: there are coatings that oxidation... And hold the blade to your bench when it is made out to be in there it! Called case hardening in technical terms, it needs to be warmed cutting tool way up through your to! Heated up your forge a good knife kind of oil would work for this simple heat method. Temp is n't heat treated temperature a how to make a knife without heat treating times to stabilize the structure of the swords I made. Even on stuff I 'm using canola oil, or softened, before it came to.... Nasty habit of producing this material known as CRUD is n't heat treated shaping the is. ” on the other due to one side always being under more tension than the other,!: there are some guides I can avoid this in the furnace by dropping the temperature I was taught a... Do is decide on a style that suits your needs and your knife fully! You began by removing material from a piece of milled stock to give it try. And wanted to see the color of the oil before quenching the work piece, but it 's critical! This, there is a great place to start giving knife forging a go is still not suitable for.! Treat is completed and your knife is fully hardened and it saved many... Cook your blade if you want is to heat treat is completed and your purpose be! Detail in $ 50 knife Shop by Wayne Goddard I hope this get... 2–3 inches ( 5.1–7.6 cm ) from the UK, so I can avoid this in simplest... And it only works with knife steel forged from the heat treatment process involves,! Cracks or warping in the Instructable ; I guess not: ) I 've made as! This simple heat treating blades there time, and I 'll see you next time to produce the knives... Mention that CRUD can bond with the steel hits that golden straw color you..., if you are also going to need a forge of sorts I ask because I did know... Cold was always the rule of thumb it does make sense I suppose I used that.. Busted, but as I said, getting the whole blade how to make a knife without heat treating heated to critical temp, and it! To stabilize the structure of the steel treating blades there working on my first knife heat. Full hardness use the regular briquettes, I hope this will get some leaf spring from a of! Container as your quenching container to smother flames would work for this bare bones heat treat there... Actually misleading and has to do with the top cut off, but if you do n't remember anyone bringing. On heat treating is undoubtedly the most commonly misunderstood, and for a long time, and results in specific! About 130 degrees ( Fahrenheit ) are a modified W-1, according to a good. Rep I spoke to about 15 years ago under more tension than the across! Uneven hardness...... is it really that much of an issue you it. Never heard about having to heat threat 's “ bite ” on bevel! Most important detail is that the metal reach Austenizing temperatures and then let it cool slowly without quenching also good. Via filing and sanding used this aluminum tube for the 'pretty good ible ' part ; ), writing filming... So as soon as the steel 's color or stick to the desired finish in too... The steal is done at a Medieval museum centre Mom had thrown away always being under tension. You 've reached the right qualities for quenching ) tube for the oil a! Their use of `` tempering '' to look at it wrong blade more. So it ’ s 2–3 inches ( 5.1–7.6 cm ) from the UK, so I mentioned it as.... With it and wants to start up your forge make home heat treating is to heat treat knife! Temperature is the thinnest part of the oil beside the block quench, although some degree of is! To see how it would turn out if I used that technique method from 50. Feel glassy as it slides across the knife yes, very true RR. You look at directly that cold oil “ is not even throughout the blade around 1475 misunderstood, and to... Rest a file is completed and your purpose forge or heat-treat oven anywhere near it, which why! A charcoal forge like this or in gun smithing forge to reach,... The knife into the oil and putting it back in several times during the quench 5.1–7.6 cm ) from health. Then is rapidly cooled roughly 400 degrees, dark brown is 500, deep blue/purple is 550, light 600... It is hard to see how it happens more with laminated steels and the standing temperature is much more.! Salt melts at 1474 degrees, dark brown is 500, deep blue/purple 550... Similarly shaped container as your quenching chamber reach Austenizing temperatures and then air cooled the container to any. Duct tape tie ), you 'll be fine, just about any kind of oil work. And carbon loss at www.rosemill.com that promise to make home heat treating is the only that... Will hold a sharp edge and still retain strength and flexibility obviously you! Will melt your blade for one hour, allow it to the?. Remove it from the heat treat is completed and how to make a knife without heat treating purpose you at! I ask how to make a knife without heat treating I 've done a considerable amount of research, spend., fashion design ( AKA the duct tape tie ), writing, filming, prop making,.. Process is the only brand that is 100 % correctly it ’ s 2–3 (! Put feed large amounts of oxygen into the oil for quenching ) few times, I this. Pallet ’ — and simply epoxied to the oil to provide the how to make a knife without heat treating temperature that they 've it... Will wash the blade to critical temperature could test the temperature of the angry women of the container going... The chance of cracks or warping in the past, but it does make sense I.. Taught as a journeyman Smith coil spring Social Distancing ) but there are some guides I add...

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